Orson Welles and the War of the Worlds

Robert Phoenix has an interesting post up about the 70th anniversary of The War of the Worlds. That was when Orson Welles terrified Americans by broadcasting that aliens had landed on earth. The stunt may rate as the best Halloween prank of all time.

I recently posted about Welles because I’m reading Simon Callow’s exhaustive biography, Orson Welles: The Road to Xanadu, which reveals Welles was born at 6 a.m., not 7 a.m., the time recorded by several astrology databases.

Here’s another factoid I discovered in the book, which I unfortunately had to return to the library even though I’m not finished because I’m on the road for awhile: During the 1930s, when Welles was working with John Houseman at the Federal Theater Project, Houseman’s lover was a woman who was born on the same day, the same year, and the same hour as Welles, and Houseman let everybody know the coincidence.

The book doesn’t note whether the woman, who was not named, was also born in Kenosha, Wis., the way that Welles was. As astrologers, we know that for Houseman’s lover to be Welles’ true astrological twin, she would have had to be born someplace near Welles’ birthplace in addition to sharing all the birth data.