Kashmir in the Crosshairs: The View from Brazil

Here’s the latest post from our intepid Brazil bureau chief, Gian Paul. While we’ve been fretting about the gyrations of the stock market, GP has been thinking about the land where the saffron grows.

It’s interesting that Gian Paul, who is Swiss-born, is fixated on Kashmir because it reminded me of Switzerland, with its chalets and snow-capped mountains, when I visited there in 2004.

Kashmir is also the homeland of the family of Neel Kashkari, the 35-year-old that Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson has named to oversee the $700 billion bailout fund. Like his boss, Kashkari has piercing eyes and a shaved head. The Indian papers are calling him the “$700 billion man.”

But Kashkari is another post. Here are Gian Paul’s thoughts on Kashmir, part of an Indian state called Jammu and Kashmir, and how it may be affected by the ingress of Pluto into Capricorn on Nov. 27. Over to you, GP:

Pluto was discovered on Feb. 18, 1930 by Clyde Tombough. The former planet’s sidereal revolution is almost 250 years. Consequently astrologers have little statistical data on Pluto’s effects.

In an effort to understand more, I’ve been sifting through astrological charts that I have accumulated over time. The most striking discovery I’ve made is related to the chart of the moment when World War I started.

The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, on June 28, 1914, in Sarajevo, was marked by the ingress of Pluto into Cancer. This is exactly opposite where Pluto will be transiting at the end of November.

So I proceeded to draw the chart of Pluto’s ingress into Capricorn. It will happen on Nov. 27, at 01 hours GMT. I drew the map for London, quite near to Greenwich, where the day begins.

The ascendant of the Pluto ingress is 24 degrees of Virgo, within 3 degrees of a conjunction to Saturn, which will be opposing Uranus. Coincidentally or not, the rising in the Sarajevo chart is just two degrees away, at 22 Virgo.

Looking beyond the financial concerns of the moment, I dug up the charts of the creation of modern India and Pakistan, as I suspect that things there have reached explosive proportions.

Pakistan is practically broke and has less than one month’s reserves to cover imports. The risk is that the government will start some stupid military initiative related to neighboring Kashmir to distract the Pakistanis from the financial problems.

A fertile highland wedged between Pakistan and India, Kashmir was put under “indefinite curfew” by India on Oct. 5.

As students of the subcontinent know, Kashmir has been a source of contention between India and Pakistan ever since the two nations were created in 1947. When Britain divided the region in two, it left the Kashmiris with three options: Merge with India, merge with Pakistan, or remain independent.

Kashmir’s then-ruler decided to go with India, though the population of Kashmir is 80% Muslim and has more in common from a religious standpoint with Pakistan than with India. Though India has many religions, the Hindus have dominated politics since the departure of the British.

For the past decade, Kashmir has been a hotbed of guerrilla activity, as Islamic militants have crossed the border from Pakistan and the Indian military has put the region under virtual house arrest.

This has nearly destroyed Kashmir’s valuable tourist trade, which dates back to British colonial times, when it was fashionable to vacation on colorfully painted houseboats on Lake Dal outside Srinigar. Most of the tourists in the area today are young Israelis, who aren’t put off by the Indian military presence or the possibility of a terrorist attack by an Islamic militia.

The problems in Kashmir might appear at first glance to be a local matter between India and Pakistan until we remember that both nations have nuclear weapons.

What’s astrologically striking about the birth charts of both nations (set for 0 hours on Aug. 15, 1947) is that Mars is at 0 degrees 35′ of Cancer. This is where Pluto was at the beginning of World War I. By the end of November, Mars will be getting the opposition of Pluto when it moves into Capricorn.

To paraphrase U.S. President John F. Kennedy, who once declared, “We are all Berliners now,” are we all about to become Kashmiris? We may have to indeed, to prevent the province from becoming a staging ground for the worst fears of mankind.

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4 comments on “Kashmir in the Crosshairs: The View from Brazil

  1. Your article has incorrect information on Kashmir and Pakistan and seems to reflect Delhi’s point of view.

    Delhi calimed to have a forged “article of accession” which it now claims is lost. According to the British Acto of Independence all Muslim majority areas of South Asia were supposed to be part of Pakistan.

    Kashmir was one such state that has wanted to be part of Pakistan.

    Bharat (aka India) subjugates it with 800,000 soldiers. Let the people of Kashmir decicde. Let there be a referendum as per dozens of UN resolutions.

    Editor Rupee News
    http://www.rupeenews.com

    • Actually, the article was written by a Swiss national who now lives in Brazil so I find it hard to believe that it reflects Delhi’s point of view. Thanks for writing in and expressing your opinion, though.

  2. To Moin Ansari

    You should decide: “who is the real enemy”, Israel or India?
    Give you a hint: Its those who manipulate the Western Press. To my knowledge it’s not India who disposes of this type of “savoir – faire”.

    Another useful hint: The young Israeli “tourists” visiting Kashmir, (as per Monica’s personal witnessing) are watching what exactly? The gondolas on Lake Sal? Or the efficiency of Indian troops? For certain not the expertise of the Indian Navy sinking Thai tawlers instead of “pirate mother ships” off the Somali coast.

    Your analysis of Holbrook’s brief is excellent. So is the precarious supply route you describe for Obama’s additional 30’000 US troops to be relocated from Iraq to Afghanistan. And your analysis of the oil and pipeline situation in the Kaspian/Georgian/Turkish part of this globe.

    Unfortunately for you and your fellow-sincere-Pakistanis my astrological analysis concerning the Pluto ingress into Capricorn is not a rapid transit. And as I have two very dear Kashmiri friends (and I know their families) I am really more concerned (personally) about Kashmir then Pakistan. But who is not subjective in today’s world?

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